Home > Books, Politics > Glenn Beck: The Overton Window (Review)

Glenn Beck: The Overton Window (Review)

I was a bit surprised when I stumbled upon The Overton Window by Glenn Beck while searching through the Thriller/Mystery section of Borders. But, being somewhat of a Glenn Beck fan I knew that it should be pretty interesting. I read the epilogue in the store and I was satisfied enough to buy it and read the rest at home.  The novel revolves around the crazy weekend of Noah Gardner, son of Arthur Gardner who is a big shot PR billionaire.

In the beginning of the book, Noah decides to go to some sort of rally put together by so-called Patriots after meeting a beautiful woman, Molly Ross, who is very involved with the group. Noah just wanted to get to know Molly, instead he is put through a roller coaster weekend, barely escaping with his life.

Many critics will condemn this book before reading it due to its controversial author, radio personality and FOX News anchor Glenn Beck. Beck says in the introduction that this book is “faction”. A fictional story based on true events and plots, at least how it is perceived by Beck. The main plot in the story is that America is falling apart, the economy has crashed and that’s just the beginning. People who view Beck’s show on FOX News or listen to his radio program will be familiar with what Beck is trying to say. He mentions and quotes the Founding Fathers on multiple occasions. Whether you agree with Beck or not, he really makes you think about what is going on in the country today. He also gives a 30 page “Afterward” that explains exactly where he got his information from.

As a thriller I think the book lacked a bit although it did keep my interest throughout. It is short, only about 300 pages and it is an easy read. But the plot is a little weak and the character development could be better. The reader will find some unorthodox dialogue in the book, which had me imagining that Beck was narrating the story, but you can sense Beck’s lack of experience with fiction books. There are a few points in the book that get dry and little boring if you do not find politics interesting, if so you probably shouldn’t spend your money on this book. It may also get you pretty mad if you do not agree with Beck’s perspective on the country and politics. Beck will have a character give a speech or just lecture for about three pages about the country and what he thinks is going on or what will happen in the foreseeable future, and while most of the content is interesting I did find myself drifting a bit during these lectures.

All in all, I enjoyed reading this book and I would give it a 3 out of 5, which is respectable. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys politics, Democrat or Republican. Beck does a good job of keeping those two words to a minimum, saying that what he thinks is the downfall of America isn’t one party’s fault, it has gone on for a long time. He also doesn’t mention a name or part for the president for the same reason. If you are a person who tends to agree with what Beck says, you will definitely enjoy the book. If you are a person who tends to oppose Beck and his preachings, you will enjoy ripping Beck and his book on your blog or web site. Whatever you do, don’t be discouraged from buying the book just because of the author.

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  1. July 12, 2010 at 3:07 PM

    Nice review, and I agree with you on the fairly long winded lectures.

    I’m not a huge Beck fan… well, alright, I don’t even really know who he is. Politicians and the figureheads who poke fun of them (or sickeningly cuddle up to them) make my head hurt and my stomach churn. My friends, on the other hand, seem to be split down the middle; they either love him to death or wish he would die. So I figured I would read his book and pretty much came to the same conclusion as you.

    The only thing I would add is that this novel doesn’t really feel like a novel. It feels like a rant, which is no different than anything Ayn Rand ever wrote and I still consumed her work like it was genius. I would say Beck should probably stay in the political world, but something tells me his first fiction novel did quite well.

    Either way, great review!

    -L87

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